71 new Australian Goblin spider species named by QM researcher

Written by: Dr Barbara Baehr, Research Scientist, Terrestrial Environments (Arachnida)

Minute goblin spiders with orange armour are widely distributed but hidden! Goblin spiders have a worldwide distribution but are most common in the tropics and subtropics. Goblin spiders are mega diverse however most of the species are short range endemics living in habitats ranging from forests to deserts. The name Goblin spiders was chosen only a few years ago because of their grotesque body shape. Most of the Goblin spiders are orange colored with an armored body.

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Fashion, Glamour & Queensland designer Gwen Gillam

Written by: Alex Richards, Digital Marketing Coordinator

This month marks the 90th anniversary of the Brisbane Arcade shopping centre. It seems like a great time to reflect on our 2012 exhibition, Dressed by the Best: Fashion, Glamour & Gwen Gillam, which shared the work of a Queensland designer based there in middle of the last century. In fact, it was while based in the Brisbane Arcade that she produced some of her best work.

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Understanding the diversity of the Great Barrier Reef – and why it’s important

Written by: Dr John Hooper, Head, Natural Environments

New species of life forms, ranging from bacteria even up to mammals, continue to be discovered across the world on a daily basis. This includes species that make up our Great Barrier Reef (GBR), one of seven natural wonders of the world. So while we may have a reasonably good idea about the numbers and different types (species) of corals and fishes that build and live in the GBR ecosystem, we know very little about the many, probably hundreds of thousands of other species living amongst them – even some very large species, but most very small.

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Remembering Mary Watson through Queensland Museum’s Collection

Written by: Carmen Burton, Assistant Curator Queensland Stories

Quite often, the social history curators at Queensland Museum get visits from all sorts of people who have surprising and interesting connections to Queensland history. Just recently I had a visit from a woman who is a descendant of Mary Watson, the colonial heroine who in 1881 escaped Lizard Island in North Queensland following conflict with local Aboriginal people.

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Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul

Written by: Alex Richards, Digital Marketing Coordinator

Our new international exhibition is one that sheds light on the story of an ancient civilisation as well as a contemporary story of the bravery of a small group of people who risked their lives to protect and preserve their cultural heritage.

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Message Sticks: rich ways of weaving Aboriginal cultures into the Australian Curriculum

Written by: Nerinda Sandry, Strategic Learning In terms of classroom learning and the Australian Curriculum, the exploration of message sticks brings together history, science, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures, literacy and art. Coupled with a trip to a museum and contact with a local Aboriginal Group where possible, the links to both Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical skills for Foundation to … Continue reading Message Sticks: rich ways of weaving Aboriginal cultures into the Australian Curriculum

Indigenous Science: Shell middens and fish traps

Written by: Letitia Murgha, Strategic Learning This article continues the theme of early indigenous scientific knowledge which often centred around the collection of food.  Most shell middens were created in ancient (pre-European contact) times and can provide valuable information about Aboriginal hunting and gathering practices.   For thousands of years, Aboriginal people caught and ate large numbers of shellfish species in and around the mangrove … Continue reading Indigenous Science: Shell middens and fish traps

New Resources to Support Sustainability Education

Written by: Marcel Bruyn, Strategic Learning Sustainability is a cross-curriculum priority of the Australian Curriculum. Sustainability addresses the ongoing capacity of Earth to maintain all life. The AC website states that: “Education for sustainability develops the knowledge, skills, values and world views necessary for people to act in ways that contribute to more sustainable patterns of living.” In Science: “… students appreciate that science provides the … Continue reading New Resources to Support Sustainability Education

Reduce Reuse and Rethink: New QM Resource

                                                        Recycling and the Australian Curriculum Teaching is characteristically a time poor occupation and no more so than in the modern classroom. In our efforts to deliver the entire curriculum (in a perfect classroom with well-behaved children who attend school nearly every day!), we need to be clever about maximising the potential of learning in each lesson. Specifically, we need to reduce the need for … Continue reading Reduce Reuse and Rethink: New QM Resource

It’s Taxon Time

Written by: Maryanne Venables, Strategic Learning The “Zoo Animals” went into the tin with the blue lid, while my “Farm Animals” went in the tin with the green lid. The animal kingdom, as I knew it, lived under my bed in Streets ice-cream tins. All were classified, according to contexts developed from the songs, books and experiences of a four-year old. Fast forward to 2012 and, … Continue reading It’s Taxon Time

Science Principles in Traditional Aboriginal Australia

During traditional times, Aboriginal people showed an ingenious mastery of physics to create hunting equipment and labour-saving tools.  They demonstrated knowledge of chemistry, held a deep understanding of biology through powerful observation and using all the senses to predict and hypothesis.  Additionally, they were competent at testing through trial and error, making adaptations and retesting to achieve a final result.   Aboriginal people were experts at reading … Continue reading Science Principles in Traditional Aboriginal Australia