Stunning new spiders jump into our hearts

Queensland Museum scientists have discovered five new jumping spider species.

Have you ever seen a more adorable spider? These cute and colourful jumping spiders are changing the reputation of arachnids around the world.

Queensland Museum arachnologist, Dr Barbara Baehr, along with colleagues Joseph Schubert from Monash University, and Dr Danilo Harms from University of Hamburg recently described the new Australian species which feature vibrant colours and perform fascinating dance rituals.

Four of the five new species are from Queensland with one from New South Wales. At only a few millimetres in size, they can be difficult to spot, despite their stunning colours.

The New Species
Jotus albimanus – White-handed Brushed Jumping Spider
Found:
New England National Park, New South Wales

Jotus fortiniae (Picture above left, image by Robert Whyte)
Found:
Cape York Peninsula, Quinkan Country, Queensland

Jotus karllagerfeldi –  Karl Lagerfeld’s Jumping Spider (picture above right, image by Mark Newton)
Found:
Lake Broadwater via Dalby, Queensland

Jotus moonensis – Mount Moon Brushed Jumping Spider
Found:
Mount Moon, Queensland

Jotus newtoni – Mark Newton’s Brushed Jumping Spider
Found:
Lake Broadwater via Dalby, Queensland

Dance like your mate is watching
The spiders are known as Brushed Jumping Spiders due to the elaborate mating dance of the males, which involves a brush of long and often colourful setae on their legs (like butterflies).

Joseph Schubert said the colour patterns in the males are species-specific and range from black and white combinations to extremely colourful morphs featuring iridescent turquoise and orange patterns.

J. fortiniae 4 (Robert Whyte)
Jotus fortiniae (image by Robert Whyte)

“The males perform unique dance rituals with their brilliantly decorated first pair of legs to attract females,” Mr Schubert said. “These five new species are close relatives of the Australian peacock spiders which also perform courtship dances for females. This courtship behaviour makes them a crowd favourite and has popularised jumping spiders worldwide.”

Karl Lagerfeld’s Jumping Spider
In true fashion style, the scientists paid homage to the late fashion icon Karl Lagerfeld, by naming a spider in his honour. Dr Danilo Harms, said the Karl Lagerfeld spider had a distinct look that was reminiscent of the late fashion designer.

Jotus karllagerfeldi is a black and white spider which we looked at and instantly thought of Karl Lagerfeld and his signature look, as the spider has large black eyes, which reminded us of sunglasses and its black and white front legs were reminiscent of Lagerfeld’s kent collar,” he said.

J. karllagerfeldi (Mark Newton) 2
Jotus karllagerfeldiKarl Lagerfeld’s Jumping Spider (image by Mark Newton)

Learn more at the Discovery Centre
Are you curious about an unidentified spider you’ve found in your backyard? Ask one of our experts here or visit the Discovery Centre on Level 4 to meet museum experts, ask questions and view exciting displays.

Remember to share you visit with us on social media by using the tag #DiscoveryQM and #myqldmuseum.

 

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