All posts by qldmuseum

Meet the Museum Teams of Tomorrow – Everyday Einstein student challenge

By Maryanne Venables

On Saturday 23 August, National Science Week may have been winding down, but here at Queensland Museum, we were cranking up!

Twenty one students from years 7-9 participated in a workshop called the Make your Museum student challenge. This (mutual) learning experience was generated in partnership with Queensland Academies as part of their Young Scholars program.
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Dr Robert Raven tells the story of two great spider discoveries in Tasmania

The paruwi spider is a new genus, discovered & named by 13 year old Robert Beeton in north-west Tasmania. Photo courtesy of Bush Blitz

Queensland Museum arachnologist Dr Robert Raven travelled to the Central Highlands of Tasmania in February surveying spiders as part of a Bush Blitz survey. And it was during this survey that uncovered two new species of spiders in one night! Dr Raven tells the story of these great discoveries.

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When is a bug not a bug?

By Dr Christine Lambkin

Did you know that during 2012-13, the Queensland Museum had nearly 13,000 enquiries through the Discovery Centre alone, that’s not including the number of people who contact staff directly. Of these enquiries, the highest numbers were for insects with nearly 3000. The next were reptiles with over 2000 enquiries. Based on this enormous number, the Queensland Museum decided to offer an Animal ID day as part of National Science Week Celebrations with a focus on these two groups.
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The ‘bric-a-brac’ of war

Australia recently celebrated National Archaeology Week. During this time, Queensland Museum Curator of Archaeology, Dr Brit Asmussen participated in some Meet the Curator sessions with a focus on discovering the stories of authentic and faux archaeological artefacts collected by servicemen stationed in Egypt in the First World War.

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Out of the Box Festival : We chat to the jellyfish from Songs of the Sonar

The Out of the Box Festival is returning to Brisbane tomorrow and bringing along 8 days of fun workshops, musical performances & lively concerts for children 8 years and under. This year’s festival is all about the many relationships children have with living creatures, both real and imaginary – an absolute must for your child’s calendar.

The Queensland Museum is thrilled to have hybrid human jellyfish, and mystical sea songstress Deepstaria Enigmatica, join us for 10 days of under the sea activities that feed on mystery, music and fun! She took time out of her busy sea-schedule to invite us into her cavernous underwater realm to discuss Songs of the Sonar, learn about her deep ocean friends and chat about the discovery of her musical talent.
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Museum for teens: Deep Oceans

Written by: Tim Janetzki is a student at Ferny Grove State High School who has taken it upon himself to discover the Queensland Museum and the amazing things within it. Over the coming months Tim will blog about his personal experiences and views on the Museum. His next assignment was discovering Deep Oceans.

Don't worry this Anglerfish is just a replica
Don’t worry this Anglerfish is just a replica

The unknown is a terrifying thing, to not know what lives in the depths of something that covers 71% of our planet’s surface, is a mystifying and uneasy feeling. Novelists have written about it, Film makers have pictured it, and scientists have corrected it, but still, we are still imagining monsters of the deep. They can’t be real, can they?

Queensland Museum’s newest exhibition is Deep Oceans sheds light on the undisturbed and inky black darkness of the seas, revealing some of the most exquisite and interesting marine life ever seen. Only 10% of the deep oceans have been explored and just from that small amount of exploration, marine biologists, scientists and explorers have just recently punctured the black veil of the ocean, allowing them to peek inside the abyssal darkness.

Get up close to the Giant Squid
Get up close to the Giant Squid

Now the Queensland Museum has put on show the rarities found within the deep ocean fissures and plains, displaying a wide range of bioluminescent fish, huge squid, Black Smoker sea vents, turbidity at different levels and air pressure. The crown jewel of the exhibition is the Giant Squid, submerged in glycerol has been preserved perfectly since its discovery in 2004, now is on display, along with the Queensland Museums own collection of diving helmets.

The many interactive displays provide easier ways of understanding the depths such as the legendary Bathysphere, a small sphere shaped submarine that was lowered down to the deep with people inside, observing the sea below with powerful lights.

One of the diving helmets from the Langley Collection
One of the diving helmets from the Langley Collection

Queensland Museum’s Deep Oceans transports you to a fabled world that has to be seen to be believed, with collections of Diving Helmets, Whale Bone carvings and stories of colossal monsters of the deep, but no one’s actually seen a monster, have they?

Deep Oceans, until 6 October 2014. Tickets cost $12.

For more information click here.