Behind the Scenes: The bushel as an imperial measure

But I thought Bushel was a brand of tea?  If you have ever watched TV programs like Stateline, you will hear the term Bushel during the market report. So what is a bushel? A bushel is an imperial measure of volume used in the sale of dry goods, first introduced by King Edgar in the city of Winchester in the 10th century. The use of a … Continue reading Behind the Scenes: The bushel as an imperial measure

Prehistoric Beasties!

Federica Turco is a post-doctoral research fellow working at Queensland Museum. She and research associate, Geoff Monteith, are investigating some amazing beetles living in dark caves near Rockhampton. These beetles have been around since the Pleistocene epoch (approx 2.6 million – 12,000 years before the present) and possibly even the Late Pliocene (3.6 million years ago). They belong to the genus Mystropomus (Order: Coleoptera; Family: … Continue reading Prehistoric Beasties!

Goblin Spiders

Dr Barbara Baehr is a PBI (Planetary Biodiversity Inventory) Research Fellow working at Queensland Museum. For the last 5 years she has been working for the PBI Goblin Spider project and this will continue for the next two years. Goblin spiders are very small, funny-looking spiders that look a bit like goblins, hence the name. There are lots of species and some have hooks, long leg spines, … Continue reading Goblin Spiders

A LA LA! – Atlas of Living Australia Live At Last

Atlas of Living Australia Live At Last! The Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) was launched in Brisbane on the 20th May. At a special ceremony held at Queensland Museum (QM), Dr John Hooper (Head of Biodiversity and Geosciences at Queensland Museum) spoke about the collaboration of museums, herbaria, universities and other government collections in producing the ALA. The ALA is an online encyclopaedia of all living … Continue reading A LA LA! – Atlas of Living Australia Live At Last

The Pursuit of Parasites

Dr. Rob Adlard is a parasitologist working at Queensland Museum. Recently Rob has been on a quest of biodiscovery to uncover some of the ‘hidden diversity’ on coral reefs with an emphasis on fish parasites. Rob and his team have uncovered many species of myxosporean parasites, some of which are Kudoa spp., and these infect our reef fish. Here is an image of Rob, Dr Terry Miller, and PhD student … Continue reading The Pursuit of Parasites

Backyard Explorer comes to Chillagoe

North Queensland event Queensland Museum scientists conducted innovative workshops in Chillagoe over 3 days in May 2011 dedicated to assessing local biodiversity and the effect of human impact using data from insect trapping. The workshop was funded with assistance from the Science Connections Program within the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research. The Queensland Museum Backyard Explorer workshops started with a free meeting with local Traditional … Continue reading Backyard Explorer comes to Chillagoe

Fantastic Phasmids

The term ‘phasmids’ (pronounced fas-mids), is just another name for the group of insects we commonly call stick insects. These amazing creatures are so well-camouflaged that they are very difficult to see amongst foliage. The Goliath Stick insect (Eurycnema goliath) is one of Australia’s largest phasmids. It is green with yellow patches on the head, thorax and legs. As well as its wonderful camouflage, these … Continue reading Fantastic Phasmids

Museum Learning Resources and the Australian Science Curriculum

Over recent years, teachers-in-residence at the Queensland Museum have developed many learning resources for teachers and students. The latest support materials have been developed to help with the implementation of the new Australian Science Curriculum. A list of these resources is provided in the PDF document below. Summaries of QM online resources that complement QM Loans kits can be found on the catalogue page of … Continue reading Museum Learning Resources and the Australian Science Curriculum

Behind the Scenes – Queensland’s First TV broadcast

When was the first TV image broadcast in Queensland? If you thought 1956 or 1959, you’d be wrong.  The first TV broadcast was made in 1934 by Thomas Elliott, from the Windmill Tower on Wickham Terrace using the machine featured in this article. I discovered this fascinating piece of technology carefully stored and cared for by Museum curators, in the storage area of the Queensland … Continue reading Behind the Scenes – Queensland’s First TV broadcast